SCOUTS - Be Prepared

Aviation Skills Training Options

Section 1 - Practical skills

  1. Build and fly a rubber-powered model for at least 15 seconds.
  2. Build and fly a model airship or hovercraft.
  3. Make and fly a boomerang.
  4. Build a scale model aircraft from a plastic kit to a satisfactory standard, and talk about its key points and history.
  5. Build a scale model from photographs or plans, or by modifying a standard kit, to produce a different but authentic version of the aircraft.
  6. Make a solid model on which all control surfaces operate and can be used to demonstrate the effects of controls.
  7. Complete a project to demonstrate a particular aeronautical principle and build a suitable model to illustrate it.
  8. Build and fly at least five different designs of paper aeroplane, using published plans if they want to.
  9. One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.
Section 2 - Flight safety and airmanship
  1. Know the dangers posed to aircraft by birds and other wildlife, the dangers posed to birds and wildlife by aircraft, and the methods employed to reduce the problem.
  2. Understand the working of an airport fire service or emergency team, the equipment used and the main rescue methods.
  3. Know the reasons for airport security, the main threats, and means of counteracting threats.
  4. Explain how an aircraft lifejacket works and demonstrate its use.
  5. Explain and illustrate the purpose and workings of an ejector seat.
  6. Demonstrate the signals required to launch a glider.
  7. Arrange for a suitably experienced instructor to train them in how a parachute works. Be able to put on a parachute harness and demonstrate the correct landing roll.
  8. Assist with the launching and recovery of a paraglider. Make two ascents, without release.
  9. Know the rules in Policy, Organisation and Rules relating to flying, and fly in a microlight aircraft as a passenger.
  10. Understand the physical fitness requirements to fly as a pilot or passenger. Be aware of health concerns such as ear blockage, hypoxia and deep vein thrombosis.
  11. Understand the responsibilities of the Commander of an aircraft, for example, briefings, safety of load and passengers, and relevant paperwork.
  12. One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.
Section 3 - Aircraft recognition and operations
  1. Describe at least six airlines by their names and markings. Identify their home countries and main bases.
  2. Identify at least six airlines by name and describe six routes operated by each, together with the aircraft used.
  3. Describe the operations of an all-cargo airline. Know the main types of cargo aircraft and their special applications.
  4. Discuss the design characteristics of a chosen aircraft in relation to its operational role.
  5. Understand the principles of air-launched and ground-based anti-aircraft weapons and the systems used to counteract them.
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of air and space surveillance systems, their types and applications.
  7. Understand the advantages of mid-air refuelling for military aircraft, the main methods of fuel transfer and the main types of tanker used.
  8. Discuss the problem of aerospace flight including acceleration to escape velocity, the reason for weightlessness and re-entry problems.
  9. Demonstrate a general knowledge of the progress of space exploration, describing in particular one space programme.
  10. Understand the principles of reusable space vehicles. Know their advantages and disadvantages over conventional rocket systems and launch vehicles.
  11. Identify six space vehicles and explain their roles.
  12. Demonstrate the scale of the solar system with a drawing or model to show the relative positions of the planets.
  13. One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.
Section 4 - Navigation
  1. Explain the workings and errors of an aircraft compass.
  2. Explain the workings of aircraft pressure instruments, for example, altimeter and air speed indicator, and the sources of errors.
  3. For a cross-country flight of at least 80 kilometres, work out the time of flight from an overhead starting point to an overhead destination at a given airspeed, assuming (a) a given headwind, (b) a given tailwind.
  4. For a cross-country flight of at least 80 kilometres, determine a heading assuming a given track, windspeed and direction.
  5. Illustrate latitude and longitude by simple diagrams. Explain the need for different types of map projections.
  6. One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.
Section 5 - Meteorology
  1. Identify the basic clouds and explain how they are formed.
  2. Explain how windspeed is measured and how weather can affect various air activities.
  3. 3 Demonstrate how to get a local forecast for an air activity.
  4. Explain the flight conditions that can be expected in various cloud formations and weather conditions.
  5. Explain how temperature and pressure are measured, list the units used and demonstrate conversions between these units by use of tables and by calculation.
  6. Identify the weather conditions associated with the movement of air masses over the United Kingdom, for example, Polar, Tropical, Maritime and Continental.
  7. Explain how readings of upper air conditions are obtained.
  8. Collect detailed weather maps of the United Kingdom from a newspaper, such as the Daily Telegraph, for a two-week period. Illustrate the development of significant weather features over this period.
  9. Demonstrate the ability to interpret Met Office reports and forecasts, such as METAR and TAF, as produced for pilots.
  10. One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.
Section 6 - Aero engines
  1. Explain how thrust is obtained by jets or rockets and explain the principle of ramjets.
  2. Explain the principles of a jet engine - centrifugal or axial compressor types - and identify the main components of such an engine.
  3. Discuss the relative merits of piston engines, turbojets, turboprops, turbofans, ramjets and rockets.
  4. Identify the main types of aircraft fuels and fuel systems.
  5. Show knowledge of the causes of aircraft noise and disturbance. Know the methods used to reduce noise from aircraft themselves and to reduce their impact in local communities.
  6. Show knowledge of the effect of aircraft engine emissions on the atmosphere and how these can be reduced.
  7. One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.
Section 7 - Communications and air traffic control
  1. Identify the signals used on an airfield signals square, together with runway and airfield markings.
  2. Identify the lamp and pyrotechnic signals used on an airfield.
  3. Understand why Morse code is still transmitted by navigational beacons and be able to recognise six three-letter sequences either from a recording or written copy.
  4. Explain the system of air traffic control in use at a small civilian airfield.
  5. Demonstrate examples of the ground-to-air emergency code.
  6. Understand the special communications difficulties for activities such as paragliding or hang gliding and the need for clearance in areas of military flying.
  7. One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.
Section 8 - Principles of flight
  1. Explain the meaning of trim and the importance of weight and balance.
  2. Explain the purpose and operation of flaps, slots and slats.
  3. Explain how basic aerobatic manoeuvres are carried out.
  4. Show knowledge of the principles of take-off and landing with special reference to light aircraft.
  5. Explain the methods by which short or vertical take-off can be achieved.
  6. Describe the airflow around a modern square parachute, explaining how it develops lift and how it is controlled.
  7. Reach a reasonable standard on a home computer flight simulator programme and understand why the aircraft behaves as it does. The suitability of the programme should be agreed by the Section leadership team.
  8. Show knowledge of the methods for operating specialised passenger aircraft into city centres, such as helicopters, STOL and tilt wing, and the main drawbacks.
  9. One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.